sam.chen

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sam.chen last won the day on February 7

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  1. Yeah, this thread is pretty old and the best cases article is pretty old as well. An update is definitely coming soon though. :)
  2. Are you referring to this article? https://www.custompcreview.com/articles/download-windows-iso-using-microsoft-windows-office-iso-download-tool/38202/ If so, I just tested it and it built me a link just fine. Which ISO you trying to download? Windows 10? If it doesn't work, maybe try downloading the legacy version of the ISO downloader. Otherwise, you can always also go to the Microsoft website and go through their process to download the ISO and make a boot drive.
  3. Ahhh OK. Well, 890Mbps isn't that bad actually. With overhead, Gigabit LAN will already drops to about 940Mbps. That said, your system doesn't cost all that much more than an Atom or Celeron based one and it does give you future capability for adding more functionality down the road. The only cost is higher electricity usage. That did get me looking a bit though and I did find this HP ProLiant which is fairly cheap. Add in a Intel Dual NIC and maybe a SSD you're good to go for ~$300 total. I like the server boards since they usually have remote management. If not remote video, there usually is remote reboot, sensor monitoring, etc. As long as you've got clearance in the area where you're looking to place the server, it could be an easier solution. Just a thought.
  4. Wow that's going to be quite the powerful router/firewall. Those options you presented are all actually good alternatives to each other. I'd just choose based on pricing. Is this for a home or business? Are you doing anything else with this system? Reason I ask is because you can get a pre-built system like this for under $300. For home use it should be more than enough and be significantly more power efficient than the Intel Core i3.
  5. Sweet. That's an excellent build. Whats up with the 1000w PSU? Was it that cheap or you have some big plans down the road?
  6. Best Buy is currently running a promotion for a free copy of Watch Dogs 2 with the purchase of the Samsung 850 EVO. If you've been looking to pick up both, this could be a good choice. Link
  7. I just took a look at the MSI website and it seems like they're listing an older Windows 7 USB 3.0 Driver compared to the driver listed on Intel's website. Have you had a chance to try the Intel USB 3.0 Driver? The one on their site was last updated 8/1/2016. It should solve your issues. https://downloadcenter.intel.com/product/65855/Intel-USB-3-0-eXtensible-Host-Controller-Driver If you're already using the updated USB 3.0 driver, it could also be power management turning off your USB port. To fix that, go to Device Manager --> Double click USB Mass Storage Device under Universal Serial Bus controllers --> Go to Power Management --> Uncheck "Allow the computer to turn off this device to save power". You might have quite a few so go ahead and uncheck them all. Then restart your computer and see if you're still having issues.
  8. Hey all, it looks like Samsung quietly updated their NVMe PCIe SSD Driver to version 2.1 back in December 2016. If you have a Samsung PCIe NVMe SSD (Samsung 950 PRO, Samsung 960 EVO, Samsung 960 PRO), it's a good idea to update it. Looks like it improves power consumption and fixes an unsafe shutdown bug in Windows 8.1 and 10. Here's a link to download the new SSD driver. http://www.samsung.com/semiconductor/minisite/ssd/download/tools.html Here's a changelog of what's been updated. Rev 1.0 - Initial release version Rev 1.1 - Driver version update for USB compatibility Rev 2.0 - Support for 960PRO and EVO Rev 2.1 - Improve idle power saving on Windows 10, Unsafe shutdown bug fix on Windows 8.1 & 10
  9. I think DOOM is the big one for Vulkan. Not sure about any other game. AFAIK, Vulkan isn't super popular compared to DX12 which seems like it's going to be the major gaming API going forward.
  10. Depends on what you're looking for. Those are good systems though. At this point, there shouldn't be anything new coming out so it's a time to buy.
  11. To help improve website security, back in June of last year, we migrated the main Custom PC Review website to SSL (Secure Sockets Layer). Today, we've also migrated the forums to SSL as well. You may have also noticed some site speed improvements. Over the past week, we've been working hard on upgrading the server software infrastructure to PHP7 which has shown drastic performance improvements over PHP 5.6. As with any major website update, there may be issues so if you run into any issues with the site, be sure to let us know. Thank you for your continued support!
  12. Yup. Like Tom said, it's an API that was formerly from AMD that was handed over to Khronos group. Nvidia adopted it into their driver packages a while back which is why it's showing up as an installed app on your system.
  13. Looks interesting... and it could be true but it's likely to be fake. That's a lot of SKUs to come out on launch day and it's highly unlikely AMD would do something like this unless most of it is OEM parts. That naming scheme is also kinda ridiculous since it's the same as the graphics which could cause quite a bit of confusion. If you drop the AMD, part in the front, those CPUs can easily get confused with the GPUs.
  14. Since it's sometimes difficult to tell what is what when it comes to mechanical keyswitches now that Cherry, ALPS and Topre are no longer the primary makers of keyswitches, here's a work in progress of all the mechanical keyswitches we know of as well as some of their specifications. Mechanical Keyswitches Cherry Cherry with its Cherry MX switches is the granddaddy of most of the world's mechanical switches. Invented in 1983, the Cherry MX switch has been around for over three decades, but as their patents on the Cherry MX switches recently expired, many companies have jumped in to produce clones of Cherry MX's switches. Cherry MX Blue Actuation Force (g): 50 Actuation Distance (mm): 2.2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 50 Million Other Characteristics: Tactile bump, Clicky Cherry MX Brown Actuation Force (g): 45 Actuation Distance (mm): 2.2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 50 Million Other Characteristics: Tactile bump Cherry MX Red Actuation Force (g): 45 Actuation Distance (mm): 2.2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 50 Million Other Characteristics: Linear (Silent) Cherry MX Black Actuation Force (g): 60 Actuation Distance (mm): 2.2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 50 Million Other Characteristics: Linear (Silent) Cherry MX Clear Actuation Force (g): 55 Actuation Distance (mm): 2.2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 50 Million Other Characteristics: Tactile bump Cherry MX Green Actuation Force (g): 80 Actuation Distance (mm): 2.2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 50 Million Other Characteristics: Clicky Cherry MX Speed Actuation Force (g): 45 Actuation Distance (mm): 1.2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 50 Million Other Characteristics: Linear (Silent) Kailh Kailh switches are Cherry MX clones, a result of Cherry's patent on mechanical switches expiring. Kailh Red Actuation Force (g): 50 Actuation Distance (mm): 2.2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 50 Million Other Characteristics: Clicky Kailh Black Actuation Force (g): 60 Actuation Distance (mm): 2.2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 50 Million Other Characteristics: Linear (Silent) Kailh Brown Actuation Force (g): 60 Actuation Distance (mm): 2.2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 50 Million Other Characteristics: Tactile Bump Kailh Blue Actuation Force (g): 60 Actuation Distance (mm): 2.2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 50 Million Other Characteristics: Tactile Bump, Clicky Gateron Like Kailh switches, Gateron switches are also Cherry MX Clones. Gateron Red Actuation Force (g): 45 Actuation Distance (mm): 2.2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 50 Million Other Characteristics: Linear (Silent) Gateron Black Actuation Force (g): 50 Actuation Distance (mm): 2.2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 50 Million Other Characteristics: Linear (Silent) Gateron Clear Actuation Force (g): 35 Actuation Distance (mm): 2.2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 50 Million Other Characteristics: Linear Gateron Brown Actuation Force (g): 45 Actuation Distance (mm): 2.2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 50 Million Other Characteristics: Tactile Bump Gateron Blue Actuation Force (g): 55 Actuation Distance (mm): 2.2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 50 Million Other Characteristics: Tactile Bump, Clicky Razer Razer switches are custom designed and tuned Cherry MX Clones initially manufactured by Kailh, but later manufactured by Greetech after a series of quality control issues. Razer Green Actuation Force (g): 50 Actuation Distance (mm): 1.9 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 80 Million Other Characteristics: Tactile Bump, Clicky Razer Orange Actuation Force (g): 45 Actuation Distance (mm): 1.9 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 80 Million Other Characteristics: Tactile Bump Razer Yellow Actuation Force (g): 45 Actuation Distance (mm): 1.2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 3 Lifespan: 80 Million Other Characteristics: Linear (Silent) Razer Mecha-Membrane Actuation Force (g): Unknown Actuation Distance (mm): Unknown Full Travel Distance (mm): Unknown Other Characteristics: Tactile, Clicky Razer Low-Profile Actuation Force (g): 70 Actuation Distance (mm): 0.9 Full Travel Distance (mm): 1.6 Lifespan: 80 Million Other Characteristics: Tactile bump, Clicky Greetech Greetech switches are Cherry MX Clones. GT02 (Black) Actuation Force (g): 80 Actuation Distance (mm): 2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 50 Million Other Characteristics: Linear GT02 (Brown) Actuation Force (g): 60 Actuation Distance (mm): 2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 50 Million Other Characteristics: Tactile Bump GT02 (Blue) Actuation Force (g): 60 Actuation Distance (mm): 2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 50 Million Other Characteristics: Tactile Bump, Click GT02 (Red) Actuation Force (g): 60 Actuation Distance (mm): 2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 50 Million Other Characteristics: Linear (Silent) Logitech Logitech first revealed their Romer G switches when they unveiled the Logitech G910 mechanical gaming keyboard. These switches are a joint development between Logitech and Omron, who manufactures the switches. Logitech's Romer G switches feature short travel distance, short acutation distance and a light guide in the center which provides better, more beautiful lighting than competing designs. The switch also features dual actuation contact points which make it more accurate and higher durability than competing designs. ROMER-G (Omron) Actuation Force (g): 45 Actuation Distance (mm): 1.5 Full Travel Distance (mm): 3 Lifespan: 70 Million Other Characteristics: Tactile bump SteelSeries SteelSeries first debut the QS1 with their Apex M800 gaming keyboard. Like the Logitech Romer G switches, the QS1 has a hollow center low travel distance and low actuation distance as well. Unlike the Romer G switches however, the QS1 does not have dual contact points nor does it have a light guide in the middle. The switches are made through a partnership between SteelSeries and Kailh. QS1 Actuation Force (g): 45 Actuation Distance (mm): 1.5 Full Travel Distance (mm): 3 Other Characteristics: Tactile bump Das Keyboard Like Razer switches, Das Keyboard switches are custom tuned switches based on existing designs. The Gamma Zulu switch is similar to the Logitech Romer G switch except it has longer key travel compared to the Romer G. The Alpha Zulu switch is similar to the Cherry MX design except it features a slightly lower actuation distance. Gamma Zulu Actuation Force (g): 45 Actuation Distance (mm): 1.5 Full Travel Distance (mm): 3 Lifespan: 100 Million Other Characteristics: Tactile bump Alpha Zulu Linear (Olive) Actuation Force (g): 45 Actuation Distance (mm): 1.7 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 60 Million Other Characteristics: Linear (Silent) Alpha Zulu Tactile (Mustard) Actuation Force (g): 45 Actuation Distance (mm): 1.7 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Lifespan: 60 Million Other Characteristics: Tactile bump Topre Topre switches are manufactured by Japanese company, Topre and are electrostatic capacitive switches. These switches utilizes a rubber dome design, but utilizes a conical spring which makes it both smooth and consistent. Aside from the Cherry MX mechanical keyswitches, many touch typists prefer the Topre switch for its smooth travel and consistent feel. Topre Actuation Force (g): 30, 35, 45, 55 Actuation Distance (mm): 2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 4 Other Characteristics: Tactile bump ALPS ALPS switches are becoming rare these days as they're very complicated, featuring as much as 11 parts per switch making them much more expensive to produce compared to competing designs. White Actuation Force (g): 60-70 Actuation Distance (mm): Unknown Full Travel Distance (mm): 3.5 Lifespan: 10 Million Other Characteristics: Tactile bump, Clicky Black (Simplified, Complicated) Actuation Force (g): 60-70 Actuation Distance (mm): Unknown Full Travel Distance (mm): 3.5 Lifespan: 10 Million Other Characteristics: Tactile bump Matias Matias switches are essentially ALPS style switches, except redesigned by Matias to make them more durable and to eliminate the "chorus of springs" sound that many users found annoying about the ALPS switch design. Matias Quiet Click Actuation Force (g): 60 Actuation Distance (mm): 2.2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 3.5 Lifespan: 50 Million Other Characteristics: Tactile bump, Clicky Matias Linear Actuation Force (g): 35 Actuation Distance (mm): 2.2 Full Travel Distance (mm): 3.5 Lifespan: 50 Million Other Characteristics: Linear Buckling Spring Buckling spring keyswitches are one of the older keyswitches which made many of IBM's keyboards of the 80's and 90's quite famous due to their satisfying click and tactile bump. Unfortunately as cheaper methods of producing keyboards emerged, the buckling spring keyboard was replaced with membrane/rubber dome designs, but many keyboard enthusiasts never forgot about their great buckling spring keyboards. Actuation Force (g): 60-70 Actuation Distance (mm): Unknown Full Travel Distance (mm): Unknown Lifespan: 25-100 Million Other Characteristics: Tactile bump, Click Non-Mechanical Switches Membrane/Rubber Dome Switch The Membrane or Rubber Dome switch is the most commonly used switch in cheap keyboards. These keyboards feature a rubber dome which is pressed down by the switch above to complete the electrical circuit. Due to the use of the dome, the keyboard is notorious for feeling mushy and cheap. Actuation Force (g): 50-60 Full Travel Distance (mm): 3-4 Other Characteristics: Mushy Scissor Switch The scissor switch uses the same design as a membrane/rubber dome switch except the keycap is held up by a scissor style stabilizer. As such, these can be significantly more low profile in design than traditional rubber dome switches making it a better option for laptops and smaller keyboards. As these keyboards also feature a rubber dome, it also feels mushy. Actuation Force (g): 50-60 Actuation Distance (mm): 1 Full Travel Distance (mm): 2 Other Characteristics: Very low profile, Mushy
  15. Not too surprised. The immigration ban and the whole Uber pricecut during the taxi protest caused some pretty big backlash for Uber, even though I think Uber did it at the time to prevent their system from overcharging the crap out of customers when demand spiked causing another form of backlash. Uber should've probably just kept quiet that they weren't going to overcharge rather than announce it at an inopportune time. That said, I think the real reason why Kalanick is leaving is because the whole council thing is merely a symbolic gesture. I seriously doubt they actually have much say in policy.